Essay about the symbolism of the scarlet letter a

Darkness is always associated with Chillingworth. Colors play a similar role to light and darkness. The context determines the meaning. Black and gray are colors associated with the Puritans, gloom, death, sin, and the narrow path of righteousness through the forest of sin. It represents the sin of the person standing upon it and it shows the Puritan way of dealing with sin.

When Hester tells him that the ship for Europe leaves in four days, he is delighted with the timing. The Puritans in that scene wear gray hats, and the darkness of the jail is relieved by the sunshine of the outside. Whereas the Puritans translated such rituals into moral and repressive exercises, Hawthorne turns their interpretations around in The Scarlet Letter.

The Puritan community sees Hester as a fallen woman, Dimmesdale as a saint, and would have seen the disguised Chillingworth as a victim — a husband betrayed. When Hester meets Dimmesdale in the forest, Pearl is reluctant to come across the brook to see them because they represent the Puritan society in which she has no happy role.

At night and always with the physician, the letter is associated with darkness and evil; in the other associations, it is a part of nature, passion, lawlessness, and imagination. The objects that had made a shadow hitherto, embodied the brightness now.

He is fiendish, evil, and intent on revenge. Every so often, sunshine flickers on the setting. Then, in chapter 18, we see Hester and Arthur talking in the forest. Thus, using his characters as symbols, Hawthorne discloses the grim underside of Puritanism that lurks beneath the public piety.

Perhaps the most dramatic chapters using these techniques are the chapters comprising the three scaffold scenes and the meeting in the forest between Hester and Dimmesdale. After deciding to go to England and live as a family Arthur, Hester, and Pearl there, Hester takes off the scarlet letter, to show that she is no longer bound by it.

Hester plans to skip town and go back to Europe with Dimmesdale. Often human beings who suffer great loss and life-changing experiences become survivors with an increased understanding and sympathy for the human losses of others. When Dimmesdale leaves the forest with his escape plan in mind, he is tempted to sin on numerous occasions during his journey back to the village.

Nighttime, however, is the symbol of concealment, and Dimmesdale stands on the scaffold at midnight, concealing his confession from the community.

The Scarlet Letter

The Puritan village with its marketplace and scaffold is a place of rigid rules, concern with sin and punishment, and self-examination.

Chillingworth loses his reason to live when Dimmesdale eludes him at the scaffold in the final scenes of the novel. Throughout the novel, The Scarlet Letter, the author, Nathaniel Hawthorne uses a few key symbols to represent major themes in the book.

Dimmesdale, on the other hand, is the secret sinner whose public and private faces are opposites. He is unable to reveal his sin. Later, when she becomes a frequent visitor in homes of pain and sorrow, the A is seen to represent "Able" or "Angel.

Hawthorne has a perfect atmosphere for the symbols in The Scarlet Letter because the Puritans saw the world through allegory. Three other symbols are the scaffold, the sun, and the forest. This is where Hawthorne errs. Objects, such as the scaffold, were ritualistic symbols for such concepts as sin and penitence.

By saying this, Hester is continuing the belief of the Puritans in the story, who see the forest as dark, or evil, as the place where the witches go at night to have meetings, and a home of the devil.

Regardless, the true duty was to punish and teach a lesson, neither of which the letter performed successfully. In the end, even the grave of Dimmesdale and Hester is in darkness. Likewise, colors — such as red, gray, and black — play a role in the symbolic nature of the background and scenery.

In closing, Hawthorne uses several symbols to portray themes and ideas in this novel.

Symbolism in The Scarlet Letter

The scaffold, like the scarlet letter, to the Puritans, is a place of public shame for those persons who decide to break the Puritan Law. The scarlet letter was her passport into regions where other women dared not tread.- Symbolism in The Scarlet Letter The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne is generally considered to be the first American symbolic novel.

A symbol is something which is used to represent something broader in meaning. Essay on the Transformation of Hester in Scarlet Letter. Free Essay: In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, symbolsim is constantly present in the actual scarlet letter “A” as it is viewed as a symbol of sin.

Symbols in Scarlet Letter essays In the novel The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne used symbolism to show the importance of or the meaning of many things. It is demonstrated throughout the entirety of the novel. Henry James, a famous American novelist, said, " there is, I think, too much.

Scarlet Letter Essay #2 Musick 1 Erich Musick AP English 3 – Scarlet Letter Essay 2b Mr. Kosek 10/19/ Symbolism in The Scarlet Letter Throughout the novel, The Scarlet Letter, the author, Nathaniel Hawthorne uses a few key symbols to represent major themes in the book.

The most obvious and well known, as it is in the title, is the. The scarlet letter is meant to be a symbol of shame, but instead it becomes a powerful symbol of identity to Hester. The letter’s meaning shifts as time passes. Originally intended to mark Hester as an adulterer, the “A” eventually comes to stand for “Able.”.

- The Symbolism of the Letter in The Scarlet Letter Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter includes many profound and important symbols. This device of symbolism is portrayed well in the novel, especially through the scarlet letter "A".

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Essay about the symbolism of the scarlet letter a
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